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Communication Access

Using TypeWell In Law School

This past academic year, I had the privilege to provide TypeWell services for a first-year law student. I’d like to share my thoughts about this experience in the hopes that it might open up new avenues of work for TypeWell transcribers, in subject areas that had previously been seen as too dense or high pressure for our meaning-for-meaning style.

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Give Students a Choice

An attitude of "I know what's best for you" does not serve students with disabilities, nor is it sustainable within the financial constraints and legal obligations of an educational institution.

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The Indispensable iPad

It was this paragraph which perhaps had the biggest impact on the acceptance of my grant proposal:

". . . there are 6 deaf and hard of hearing students that are at the academic level to use transcription, but the impact goes much further than these students, by enabling them to interact more in classes with [hundreds of] their hearing peers, share their valuable input, and access the auditory environment."

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Church Assignments for Transcribers

Speech-to-text transcribers with excellent skills may find rewarding, long-term assignments providing transcription services in churches.

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Churches CAN Afford Transcribing Services

Real-Time transcribing services can be affordable for churches, allowing all members the ability to fully participate and feel integrated into the congregation.

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Real-Time Transcribing: The Best Accommodation for Churches

Unlike schools, churches are exempt from disability laws. It is obvious that church leadership recognizes their civic and moral obligation to accommodate people with disabilities, despite the legal exemption. But what are they doing to accommodate people with hearing loss? 

The more I thought about this, the more it bothered me. Before long, my agency's focus had shifted from schools to churches...

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Going Remote: What the Future Holds

It can be frustrating. We run into glitches. We plot solutions, consider new approaches.

But then a call comes through from a student and it’s as clear as a concert hall. Closing your eyes, it’s as though the teacher is speaking directly to you. You hear everything. You capture everything. And your transcribing finds another gear you didn’t know existed...

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Going Remote: Challenges and Triumphs

We enjoyed having a space of our own, were grateful not to fight against traffic and parking, appreciated not having to lug our equipment up and down WVU’s substantial hills. Still, we missed walking around campus, the dull glow of florescent lights made us long for the sun, and we were pretty sure that, even under the best circumstances, we were still capturing and chunking only about 80% of what we had been catching previously. Our mood was somber. What have we done?

If we truly believed in our efficacy as “problem solvers,” then this was exactly the sort of experience that we had signed up for. We just had to figure out how to make it work...

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Going Remote: Leaving the Classroom

Tucked away in a quiet corner of  West Virginia University’s Evansdale Campus sits our office. It’s decorated modestly with family photos, portable cork boards, chemistry-symbol cheat sheets, and ever-changing class schedules. It smells of the endless pots of coffee we guzzle—high-test fuel. And, at any given time, the air may be filled with the clacking of thirty rapidly typing fingers. 

We didn’t always work from a central location. Once, we were nomads, traveling from one classroom to the next, fighting traffic, trolling the parking lots in search of parking. But times have changed...

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